A zesty return

Tortilla_soup

We had such a delicious dinner last night. I made one of our all time favorites,
Vegetarian Tortilla Soup. I originally
got the recipe from Epicurious.com.
 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

VEGETARIAN
TORTILLA SOUP

Pair this with a green salad for a light lunch.

Nonstick vegetable oil spray
3/4 cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon chili powder
4 cups canned vegetable broth
4 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

4 6-inch-diameter corn tortillas, cut into 1/2-inch-wide strips
1 1/2 cups chopped tomatoes
2/3 cup canned black beans, rinsed, drained
2/3 cup chopped zucchini
1 1/2 tablespoons minced seeded jalapeño chili

Spray large nonstick saucepan with vegetable oil spray. Add onion and garlic;
cover and cook over medium-low heat until almost tender, stirring often, about
5 minutes. Stir in tomato paste, cumin and chili powder. Add broth and 2
tablespoons cilantro; bring to boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until
flavors blend, about 15 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill. Bring
to simmer before continuing.)

Add tortillas, tomatoes, beans, zucchini and jalapeñp to soup. Cover; simmer
until zucchini is tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Ladle soup into bowls. Sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons cilantro. Per
Serving: calories, 157; total fat, 3g; saturated fat, 0.5g; cholesterol, 0mg.

Serves 4.

I change it a little each time I make it.

Last night was an especially rare treat, as all of the
produce was home grown.

Now that’s rewarding!

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “A zesty return

  1. Sounds delicious. Any data on carbs and protein? Also, have you grown cilantro? I did a search and it sounds like something you can grow, but it bolts quickly so you have to plant in rotation to have greens all summer. I love the taste of cilantro! Glad you’re back!

  2. Sounds delicious. Any data on carbs and protein? Also, have you grown cilantro? I did a search and it sounds like something you can grow, but it bolts quickly so you have to plant in rotation to have greens all summer. I love the taste of cilantro! Glad you’re back!

  3. Yes, I did grow it.
    And it did, indeed, bolt very quickly. I’ve gone through a couple of plants so far and am having a hard time finding another one this late in the year.
    But, each one produces a lot of herb, so its absolutely worth it!
    Gardening is just such a continuous pleasant surprise.
    One of the best parts was the patch of volunteer sunflowers that came up right next to the gate.

  4. Yes, I did grow it.
    And it did, indeed, bolt very quickly. I’ve gone through a couple of plants so far and am having a hard time finding another one this late in the year.
    But, each one produces a lot of herb, so its absolutely worth it!
    Gardening is just such a continuous pleasant surprise.
    One of the best parts was the patch of volunteer sunflowers that came up right next to the gate.

  5. I was really going to praise your presentation skills, until I realized the pic prolly came from Epicurious. I’m still praising the taking time to cook skills, though.

    Maybe once I am married I will feel more drive to do so. I love to cook, I am just lazy as all hell.

  6. Ooooh, that sounds and looks sooo yummy! I will have to try that recipe out some time.
    How cool that you grew all of your own produce for it too! Homegrown veggies taste the best. 🙂
    Thanks again for the link!!!

  7. I used the wrong word. I should have said succession, not rotation. I’m all inspired now to try planting cilantro next year. You know, of course, that you can collect the seeds of the plants that bolt and make corianeder, or just let it self seed. The only problem with that is that you will get a lot of cilantro at once.

  8. I wouldn’t mind having a lot at once. I learned a nifty little trick for saving fresh herbs.
    You chop them up and place them into mini-muffin tins. Then pour water over and freeze.

    Now I’ve read a few reviews of methods for doing this, and it seems that the best route is for the water to be boiling when poured, as that those who haven’t done so have reported a haylike smell.

    Once thes have frozen, you pop them out and place them into ziplock freezer bags. Pretty cool, eh?

    I plan to do this with my basil, lemon balm and stevia.

  9. Oh, and I forgot to say last post. As for the carb/protien thing, I’m not sure. This recipe doesn’t have corn or much of anything sweet at all.
    Also, I use low-carb tortillas, so the only significant carbs, it would seem, come from the beans. But they’ve got a lot of fiber, so I’d think that it would be faily low on the whole glycemic index thing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s